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ISCSW Events Schedule

Events

Oct 2014

Please Click on the title of each event to register and to get more specific information
Date/Time Event
October 26, 2014 - March 08, 2015 9:30 am - 12:30 pm
Full Series 2014-2015 -- The Jane Roiter Sunday Morning Seminars
Center for Practice Excellence, Northbrook IL

The Jane Roiter Sunday Morning Seminars
The Therapeutic Relationsip Reimagined: Mindfulness, Intimacy, Dreaming and Political Consciousness

Booking this event includes access to all seminars in this series.

  • Jane Roiter Sunday Seminars -- Georgia Jones – October 26, 2014, 9:30 am - 12:30 pm
  • Jane Roiter Sunday Seminars -- Anna Lieblich – January 11, 2015, 9:30 am - 12:30 pm
  • Jane Roiter Sunday Seminars -- Frank Summers – February 01, 2015, 9:30 am - 12:30 pm
  • Jane Roiter Sunday Seminars -- Irwin Hoffman – March 08, 2015, 9:30 am - 12:30 pm
  • Download the Full Series PDF Brochure

     

    Conference Planning Committee:
    Karuna Bahadur, LCSW, Carol Crane, LCSW, Margaret Grau, LCSW, Mary Ann Jung, LCSW (Co-Chair), Eric Ornstein, LCSW (Chair), and Jane Pinsof, LCSW.

    Jan 2015

    Please Click on the title of each event to register and to get more specific information
    Date/Time Event
    January 11, 2015 9:30 am - 12:30 pm
    Jane Roiter Sunday Seminars -- Anna Lieblich
    Center for Practice Excellence, Northbrook IL

    The Therapeutic Relationship Reimagined: Mindfulness, Intimacy, Dreaming, and Political Consciousness

    Intimacy in the Therapist-Client Relationship: From Treatment Alliance to Real Relationship

    The relationship between client and therapist has repeatedly been shown to be a crucial factor in therapy success. Therapeutic alliance is commonly used to describe the relationship; a good alliance enables client and therapist to work together to advance the goals of therapy. In this presentation, we will explore an alternative view: That the relationship, specifically an intimate relationship, is itself therapeutic. Intimacy would seem to be problematic in therapy, however. Intimate relationships are characterized by mutual self-revelation and mutual influence. The therapist, on the other hand, needs to be mindful of necessary boundaries and of the asymmetrical nature of the therapist’s and client’s participation and needs. We will discuss what intimacy looks like within the constraints of therapy, and how it is beneficial. Issues of knowing and being known, self-disclosure, empathy, and gratification of needs will be discussed. We will ponder how this relational approach fits with the current emphasis on evidence-based practice.

    Presenter:

    Anna Lieblich, LCSW, has been in private practice in Highland Park for more than 30 years. She supervised and taught at The Family Institute at Northwestern University and at the Institute for Juvenile Research. She has also done field instruction for the University of Illinois at Chicago, Jane Addams School of Social Work and the University of Chicago, School of Social Service Administration. Ms. Lieblich has a PhD in Comparative Social Behavior from the University of Pennsylvania and an MSW from the University of Illinois at Chicago. Her particular interests are the therapist-client relationship and the process of supervision/consultation.

    Download the Full Series PDF Brochure

    Feb 2015

    Please Click on the title of each event to register and to get more specific information
    Date/Time Event
    February 01, 2015 9:30 am - 12:30 pm
    Jane Roiter Sunday Seminars -- Frank Summers
    Center for Practice Excellence, Northbrook IL

    The Therapeutic Relationship Reimagined: Mindfulness, Intimacy, Dreaming, and Political Consciousness

    To Live in a Dream

    This presentation will set forth a view of dreaming that fits the contemporary concept of psychoanalytic therapy as the investigation into pure human subjectivity. To develop a theory of dreaming that comports with our understanding of psychoanalysis as immersion into the experiencing subject, one must reestablish the roots of analytic therapy. Heidegger’s view of human being as “being-in-the-world,” provides psychoanalysis with a view of itself as an inquiry into the human subject. The dream then becomes a mode of being-in-the-world, and this view of dreaming has far reaching theoretical and clinical consequences. A theory of dream interpretation built on this ground has subtle but powerful implications for a new theory of dream interpretation. The theory will be illustrated with numerous clinical examples.

    Presenter:

    Frank Summers, PhD, ABPP, a psychoanalyst and clinical psychologist, is Professor of Clinical Psychiatry and the Behavioral Sciences at Feinberg School of Medicine, Northwestern University, Supervising and Training analyst at The Chicago Institute for Psychoanalysis, and The Chicago Center for Psychoanalysis. He is currently president of the Division of Psychoanalysis of the American Psychological Association. He is also a member of the editorial boards of Psychoanalytic Psychology and The Annual of Psychoanalysis. He is the author of 4 books, Object Relations Theories and Psychopathology: A Comprehensive Text, Transcending the Self, Self Creation: Psychoanalytic Therapy and the Art of the Possible, and The Psychoanalytic Vision: The Experiencing Subject, Transcendence, and the Therapeutic Process. He maintains a private practice of psychoanalysis and psychoanalytic psychotherapy in Chicago, Illinois.

    Download the Full Series PDF Brochure

    Mar 2015

    Please Click on the title of each event to register and to get more specific information
    Date/Time Event
    March 08, 2015 9:30 am - 12:30 pm
    Jane Roiter Sunday Seminars -- Irwin Hoffman
    Center for Practice Excellence, Northbrook IL

    The Therapeutic Relationship Reimagined: Mindfulness, Intimacy, Dreaming, and Political Consciousness

    Sixteen Principles of Dialectical Constructivism Revisited: From 2000 to 2014: The Impact of Raised Political Consciousness

    The essential principles of “dialectical constructivism” as articulated in 2000-2002 are restated with addenda attached to each principle reflecting my struggle to integrate raised political consciousness into my clinical sensibility and practice. We start with the psychoanalytic situation itself and with a relational perspective that insists on viewing the patient and the analyst as responsible agents who co-construct the course of the work. Each participant creates a context that influences but does not wholly determine the experience and the participation of the other. Widening that perspective I want to consider the larger sociopolitical surround as it bears on the experiences of both participants. That surround calls for attention and critical reflection, including moral judgment, rather than uncritical acceptance as the necessary “reality” to which everyone must adapt.

    Presenter:

    Irwin Hoffman, PhD, is faculty and supervising analyst at the Chicago Center for Psychoanalysis and at the National Training Program for Contemporary Psychoanalysis, Lecturer in Psychiatry at the University of Illinois College of Medicine, and Adjunct Clinical Professor at the New York University Postdoctoral Program in Psychoanalysis and Psychotherapy. He is on the editorial boards of Psychoanalytic Dialogues and Contemporary Psychoanalysis. He is the author of a series of publications developing his “dialectical- constructivist” point of view, including his book Ritual and Spontaneity in the Psychoanalytic Process. In a series of essays since the book, Dr. Hoffman has explored new frontiers of this perspective centering on the responsibility of the patient and the analyst as creative participants in the analytic work and as moral agents in the world.

    Download the Full Series PDF Brochure